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Leadership Development and Reducing…

Employee turnover is one of the most annoying things in business. It means you've got to take the time to go through the hiring process again, hope that you find the right candidate, and train them hoping that they'll get up to speed as quickly as the person that left the position. Employee turnover results in lost time and money, and in some situations, can mean that your other employees may start feeling the brunt of having to pick up the slack for the person that's gone which can create a nasty cycle. That is where actionable ideas on employee retention come into play. There are a lot of reasons for turnover, and in any company, they can differ. Sometimes those in leadership roles are unable to do anything about it, but other times, actions by leadership can make a world of difference. Leadership development is one such area. Employees and Money One of the first things that some management professional think about when it comes to employee turnover is money. Data scientists have found that while pay is important, it's not the top predictor of employee satisfaction. Things that are important include the values and culture of the company in addition to what type of leadership and future opportunities are available to employees. Leaders that tap into the potential of their employees beyond just the skill they need to..

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7 Reasons Why Employees…

Employee turnover will cost you, and in ways you may not have previously considered. Higher than average turnover can sink morale, cut production, and tax you dearly in training costs. Although not every resignation can or should be thwarted, by understanding the reasons why employees quit, you can reduce turnover accordingly. We'll take a look at seven reasons why employees resign and move on as well as how to counter each one. 1. Poor hiring decisions. Sometimes people leave or are pressured out simply because they were the wrong person for the job. Worse, this individual may have been wrong for your company's culture. That's a clash in interests that could have been averted before they were hired. If your company consistently hires the wrong people, then your method of recruiting, evaluating, interviewing, and offering jobs to these individuals is all wrong. Something is broken in the process and needs to be fixed. Human Resources must be empowered to have the final say whether an individual is hired or not. If they already have that say, then something in the HR department needs overhauling. 2. An uncompetitive compensation package. Salary and benefits work in tandem to form your business' compensation package. Naturally, such packages should be tailored to individual employees, especially as they move up in the ranks. While the initial compensation package may be sufficient to attract an employee,..

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Virtual is a Reality

If your firm offers customer service, inside sales, or help desk assistance you undoubtedly staff a call center. Should you, for financial, recruitment, safety, insurance or real estate reasons, want to seriously consider going virtual (remote call center staffing) you have two options. You can go it alone, sending some of your call center staff home, overseeing the transition and the supervision in-house. Or, to expand your current staff, you can look to virtual call center firms. These agencies are fast becoming an attractive alternative to your spending time finding, training, supervising and paying your newly-virtual staff. How do you decide which alternative is the most attractive – affordable, efficient, effective? Jack Heacock, virtual call center/telework consultant with the Heacock Group and Vice President of the Telework Coalition, is an expert on this issue. He is past president of the International Telework Association and Council and board member of Call Center Magazine. His background includes many years as a call center administrator. “There are a number of factors involved in setting up your own virtual call center,” Heacock advised: “ IT, Human Resources, pay, replacement of broken parts, termination of a virtual employee, employee relocation and so forth.” Heacock noted several points your management team should discuss: How much money are you going to invest up front? How do you take HR people used to face-to-face interviews and training and..

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Why Reaching the Casual…

When the unemployment rate is high, employers can pick and choose their new hires from the ranks of those without a job. Those job seekers may need to update their skills, and they may need a bit of retraining here and there, but they are widely available and anxious for a new opportunity. Things become considerably more challenging when the economy turns around and the unemployment rate dips. While no one wants a bad economy, it is hard to deny that a good economy presents a difficult environment for those with jobs to fill. Economists used to define full employment as a 5% unemployment rate, and though things have changed somewhat, that guideline is still a useful one for employers and hiring managers. When the unemployment rate dips to the 5% level and below, an overwhelming percentage of workers who want jobs already have jobs. Hiring new workers in an environment like that can be challenging to say the least, but all is not lost. Some 95% of the working-age population may have jobs, but that does not mean they love their jobs or their employers. No matter how high or low the unemployment rate, there are always disaffected workers, or employees who would eagerly switch jobs if given the opportunity. That is where the casual job search comes into play. Employers who are able to reach out to those..

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3 Toxic Employee Types…

Too many businesses struggle recognizing toxic personalities on their staff. Sometimes their personal feelings get in the way, or they don't know what a bad employee looks like. Spending a few minutes learning common personality types can help them uncover troubling habits, and decide strategies that work for their team. The Micromanager Managers should delegate responsibilities, but some concentrate too much on small details. Micromanagers spend most of their time pestering underlings about small details, sabotaging their productivity. Instead of assigning tasks and offering help or correction when needed, they hover behind employees, making sure they use the water cooler correctly. Of course, this wastes the micromanager's time, too! Thankfully, nitpicky leaders aren't hard to spot. Look for annoyed or unproductive employees. If everyone is trying to do their job well but can't, look to management first. If they are always babysitting their employees instead of giving them space, you probably have a micromanager. Asking employees about how their coworkers spend their time is sometimes helpful, but could backfire, too. Looking at body language and attitude is a safer approach, and you can always ask questions to confirm your suspicions later. Remember, you will lose your staff's trust if they think you are talking behind their back. The Pretender Intelligent people will find ways to save time and effort, at work or home. You should always ask yourself if an..

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Fine-Tune Recruitment Advertising to…

An enduring characteristic of the job market is that there have always been more job-seekers than available jobs, not least because of constantly growing populations and sluggish economic growth. In an environment where job demand exceeds supply, your company should find it easy to fill vacancies. All you need do is release a recruitment advertisement in target group-appropriate media to attract plenty of job hunters. But is a huge response what you really need? Wouldn't this burden your HR department with the task of sifting through dozens of applications, many of which might not fill the bill? Wouldn't it be better if your recruitment ad had filters built into it, so you net the right people? Here are pointers to help you craft a job ad--not to draw an exceptional number of people, but a number of exceptional ones. Make it stand out Look at the 'Appointments' page of a newspaper. You'll see a formidable mass of text with nothing to break the monotony. This is because most recruitment ads are designed without visuals on the assumption that job seekers will find what they're looking for anyway. But what if your recruitment ad is missed altogether? Wouldn't it be better to treat it like a regular display ad, with a powerful headline and arresting visuals that are sure to be noticed? This means going in for a larger size, so..

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